Wyoming blog 2021

When Candy and I moved to Wyoming in 2014, I started keeping a photo diary of everything we did and saw. This is my current 2021 blog page. For archives of past years, please follow these links:

It’s now been 7 years since we moved to Wyoming. We’ve certainly heard the creaking and cracking noises of a frozen lake. However, we just heard for the first time something known as “singing ice”. At Ocean Lake it had a higher, more musical pitch. Unfortunately, recordings didn’t come out well. At Frye Lake the sound was a low pitched, eerie, almost SciFi sound. Turn up the volume and listen in… (Sorry, I didn’t realize until after I posted this that the sound is terrible on a smartphone. Really needs to be on a computer with good speakers.)

If you’ve follow my blog, you know about Sinks Canyon State Park. Here is “The Sink” in winter.

Sinks Canyon winter
"The Sink"

Interesting frozen splashes

Sinks Canyon State Park Wyoming
"The Sink"
Sinks Canyon State Park Wyoming
Sinks Ice closeup
Sinks Canyon State Park Wyoming
Sinks Ice closeup

03/05/21: Mars Pleiades conjunction over the Tetons

Mars Pleiades conjunction over Tetons

03/27/21: Took another brief trip over to the Tetons. We saw several moose. This one is a bull moose taking a midday siesta.

Bull moose at Tetons
Bull moose
Bull moose at Tetons
Bull moose

Found this group of Bighorn Sheep rams in the Elk Refuge in Jackson.

Bighorn Sheep rams Jackson Hole
Bighorn Sheep
Bighorn Sheep ram
Bighorn Sheep ram

I’m not proud of this, but I now feel like a Paparazzi. We were driving past the Shane Cabin ruins when THERE HE WAS! I spotted the world famous Dr. Jackson Crawford recording one of his iconic outdoor YouTube videos and just had to snap a photo.

Dr. Jackson Crawford at the Shane Cabins
Dr. Jackson Crawford at the Shane Cabins

Fresh snow and strong winds make for an beautiful Teton scene.

Teton range
Teton range
Grand Teton and Teewinot
Grand Teton and Teewinot

5/14/21: For our first camping trip of the year we went to Weeping Rock Campground near Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. We like this campground because it is small and quiet and, of course, it has the “weeping rock“.

Weeping Rock Campground
Weeping Rock
Weeping Rock Campground
Weeping Rock

We also come here for the birds.

White-faced Ibis
White-faced Ibis
Eared Grebes
Eared Grebes
Northern Flicker
Northern Flicker

For about 20 years, I owned a top-of-the-line bird photography lens. A couple of years ago I sold it because it was getting too heavy for an old man like me to carry for any significant distance. I purchased a much cheaper and lighter weight telephoto lens. Sadly, I wasn’t happy with the lens’s sharpness and haven’t used it much. However recently I learned some new camera settings and new techniques especially to shoot birds in flight. I thought this would be a good location to try it out again.

For several years we’ve known about a Ferruginous Hawk nest and have photographed it in the past with fledglings, but I’ve always wanted to get an in flight Ferruginous Hawk photo.

Ferruginous Hawk
Ferruginous Hawk

There were 5 species of swallow at our campsite. One evening I saw them flying very close to the surface of the water. I assumed they were feeding on mosquitoes or other insects just above water level. Swallows are not only very fast, but they change direction abruptly, but I had a lot of fun trying (and finally succeeding) to get flight shots.

Violet-green Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Barn Swallow
Barn Swallow

Periodically a swallow would hit the water briefly. It appeared that they just skimmed the water as if to get a drink or pick off an insect. However, then I got this sequence of a Violet-green Swallow at 10 frames/second. Notice the center frame shows the swallow is completely submerged underwater!

Violet-green Swallow dive
Violet-green Swallow dive
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